Tuesday, 13 August 2013

Hurricanes

Hurricanes are regions of low air pressure that form over oceans in tropical climate regions. Hurricanes are large storms with revolving winds. They form over the warm waters of the ocean when temperature and pressure difference between the water and clouds is large. The clouds pull the moisture and the air near the surface of the water up, toward the clouds, which produces a column of fast-moving air. 

At times, the air in one place is warmer than in another place near it. Warm air is lighter and thinner than cool air. When cool heavier air touches warm air, it presses against it and sets in motion. Some of the warm air moves up and sideways. As the warm air keeps moving up and side and out of the way, the cool air rushes in to take its place. This motion of the air is the wind. Most of the air all over the surface of the earth is rotating. 

Hurricanes may have a diameter of 400 to 500 miles (640-800 kilometers). It hit land with great force, bringing huge waves and heavy rain. Many hurricanes cause severe flooding.

Tuesday, 19 February 2013

Airport update

Flights out of Baton Rouge, La., resumed for most carriers today. A phoner to a local news station reported that many carriers actually upgraded the size of the planes leaving BTR today. Additionally, several carriers scheduled extra flights out of BTR in order to help stranded travelers return home. It also gives locals who were out of town an opportunity to get home as soon as possible.

Tuesday, 7 August 2012

Kayes

Kayes (Bambara Kayi, Soninké Xaayi) is a city in western Mali on the Sénégal River, with a population of 127,368 at the 2009 census. Kayes is the capital of the administrative region of the same name. The name "Kayes" comes from the Soninké word "karré", which describes a low humid place that floods in rainy season. The city is located 420 kilometres (260 mi) northwest of the capital Bamako.

Wednesday, 13 June 2012

1980 Pacific hurricane season

The 1980 Pacific hurricane season was an ongoing event in tropical cyclone meteorology. This season may be described through a series of negatives: no one was killed; no damage was inflicted; and no tropical cyclones made landfall. Indeed, this season is mostly notable due to a lack of notable tropical cyclones.
The season officially started May 15, 1980 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1980 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1980. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern and central Pacific Ocean. However, due to an early system that crossed in from the western Pacific, this season actually began in April.

Excluding the storm that entered from the western Pacific basin and an unnamed tropical depression, fourteen tropical storms and hurricanes formed. This total is slightly below the long-term average. All eastern Pacific systems this year formed in the eastern Pacific proper.

Tuesday, 30 August 2005

current weather - 7:30 CST Monday

Looks like I'm up for good now because it is no longer possible to sleep at all.

The wind gusts are heavy - to say the least.

It sounds like someone is standing outside both my door & all my windows & shaking them. Hard. And according to the news it is only winds at 20 miles per hour. Winds should peak around 60 miles per hour in about an hour & a half.

From my end though things are pretty good. The news just said that this it the "best" of the worst case senario.

11k people in the Baton Rouge metro area (very small amount) are without power now due to downed trees.

current weather - 4:45 CST Monday

I'm only posting because the wind woke me up & I still have power.

I am not about to go outside right now for a weather report, but I can tell you from the sounds coming from my window that it is very windy & raining. I can hear a light pelting of rain against the window. I can hear some very strong gusts in there as well.

Back to bed for now, but I'll be back to posting soon. Hopefully this post will keep my sister from calling me at 6 a.m. for a weather report.

more on current wind gusts

Average wind gust is 14 miles per hour (live according to a handheld device they are showing on the news) out by the Mississippi River front, which is not far from me. The device the reporter is using said that there was a gust at 45 MPH an hour ago & the biggest one we're getting now is around 30.

Again, they expect that to double soon.

It is still raining pretty hard.

There are apparently idiots walking down by the water front "sight seeing."
posted by ka